Reviews

The following bibliography comprises a complete list of my Books (B), Articles (A), and Reviews (R), which are below from 1967 to the present. There is also available a more detailed list of Selected Works, with excerpts from reviews.

1963 R1 “Modern Shakespeare Criticism”. Review of Shakespeare Survey Vol. 16; Anne Ridler (ed.), Shakespeare Criticism, 1935–1960; and Richard Hosley (ed.), Essays on Shakespeare and Elizabethan Drama, The Cambridge Review, Vol. 85, 30 Nov., pp. 162–7.
1964 R2 “Mistaken Priorities”. Review of Lawrence V. Ryan, Roger Ascham, The Cambridge Review, Vol. 85, 9 May, p. 407.
  R3 “Celebrating Shakespeare: Critics”. Review of J. G. McManaway (ed.), Shakespeare 400; G. I. Duthie (ed.), Papers mainly Shakespearian; A. Kettle (ed.), Shakespeare in a Changing World; Phyllis Hartnoll (ed.), Shakespeare in Music; J. C. Trewin, Shakespeare on the English Stage, 1900–1964; Louis Marder, His Exits and his Entrances; and John Wain, The Living World of Shakespeare: A Playgoer’s Guide, The Cambridge Review, Vol. 86, 28 Nov., pp. 150–5.
1965 R4 “Celebrating Shakespeare (2): Scholars”. Review of C. Hinman (ed.), Shakespeare Quarto Facsimiles: Hamlet (1604–5) and King Lear (1608); G. R. Smith, A Classified Shakespeare Biblio-graphy, 1936–1958; A. Harbage and S. Schoenbaum (eds.), Annals of English Drama, 975–1700; G. Bullough (ed.), Shakespeare: The Narrative and Dramatic Sources. Vol.V:The Roman Plays; N. Coghill, Shakespeare’s Professional Skills, The Cambridge Review, Vol. 86, 29 May, pp. 451–5.
1966 R5 “In search of Arcadia”. Review of Sidney’s Arcadia; W. R. Davis, A Map of Arcadia: Sidney’s Romance in its Tradition; and R. H. Lanham, The Old Arcadia, The Cambridge Review, Vol. 88, 29 Oct., pp. 62–4.
1967 R6 Review of J. L. Styan, Shakespeare’s Stagecraft, The Cambridge Review, Vol.89, 18 Nov, pp. 125–6.
1968 R7 Review of Paolo Rossi, Francis Bacon: From Magic to Science, tr. S. Rabinovitch, The Cambridge Review, Vol. 89, 3 May, pp. 428–9.
  R8 Review of John Buxton, A Tradition of Poetry; Enid Welsford (ed.), Spenser: Fowre Hymnes, Epithalamion. A Study of Edmund Spenser’s Doctrine of Love; and Neil L. Rudenstine, Sidney’s Poetic Development, Critical Quarterly, 10: 302–4.
1970 R9 Review of Lee A. Sonnino, A Handbook to Sixteenth Century Rhetoric; Rosemary Freeman, English Emblem Books; Alice Walker and Gladys Willcock (eds.), The Arte of English Poesie by George Puttenham, Critical Quarterly, 12: 382–3.
  R10 Review of Joan Webber, The Eloquent ‘I’. Style and Self in Seventeenth-Century Prose, Review of English Studies, 21: 361–5.
  R11 “Rhetorical Terms”. Review of Marsh H. McCall, Jr., Ancient Rhetorical Theories of Simile and Comparison, TLS, 18 Dec, p. 1488.
1971 R12 Review of Dorothy L. Sipe, Shakespeare’s Metrics, Yearbook of English Studies, 1: 241–3.
  R13 “Brittle-witted style-setter”. Review of Annabel M.Patterson, Hermogenes and the Renaissance, TLS, 28 May, p. 626.
  R14 Review of W. Schleiner, The Imagery of John Donne’s Sermons, Review of English Studies, 22: 342–4.
  R15 “Bardography”. Review of Samuel Schoenbaum, Shakespeare’s Lives, The Cambridge Review, Vol. 93, 22 Oct., pp. 24–5.
1972 R16 Review of Harry Caplan, Of Eloquence. Studies in Ancient and Mediaeval Rhetoric, eds. Anne King and Helen North; Peter Dixon, Rhetoric, TLS, 21 July, p. 849.
  R17 Review of Charles Trinkaus, In Our Image and Likeness. Humanity and Divinity in Italian Humanist Thought, Review of English Studies, 23: 474–8.
1973 R18 Review of Stanley E. Fish (ed.), Seventeenth-century Prose: Modern Essays in Criticism; William R. Keast (ed.), Seventeenth-century English Poetry: Modern Essays in Criticism, Modern Language Review, 68: 385–8.
  R19 Review of P. C. J. Field, Romance and Chronicle: A Study of Malory’s Prose Style, English Language Notes, 11: 291–5.
  R20 Review of A Shakespeare Bibliography: The Catalogue of the Birmingham Shakespeare Library, TLS, 14 Dec, pp. 1525–6.
1974 R21 Review of Daniel A. Fineman (ed.), Shakespearian Criticism, by Maurice Morgann, Yearbook of English Studies, 4: 276–9.
  R22 Review of Stanley E. Fish, Self-Consuming Artefacts: The Experience of Seventeenth-Century Literature, Renaissance Quarterly, 27: 117–22.
  R23 “Schriftsteller und Diplomat. Philip Sidneys dichterisches Schaffen”, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 22 Oct., p. 68.
1975 R24 Review of James M. Osborn, Young Philip Sidney, 1572–1577; Forrest G. Robinson, The Shape of Things Known: Sidney’s ‘Apology’ in its Philosophical Tradition, Yearbook of English Studies, 5: 262–7.
  R25 Review of M. M. Badawi, Coleridge: Critic of Shakespeare, Yearbook of English Studies, 5: 302–4.
  R26 “Sir Philip Sidney in neuem Licht. Arbeiten zu Werk und Leben des englischen Dichters”. Review of Jean Robertson (ed.), The Countess of Pembroke’s ARCADIA (The Old Arcadia); Katherine Duncan-Jones and Jan Van Dorsten (eds.), Miscellaneous Prose of Sir Philip Sidney; G. K. Shepherd (ed.), An Apology for Poetry, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 23 Feb., p. 60.
  R27 Review of Lisa Jardine, Francis Bacon. Discovery and the Art of Discourse, TLS, 20 June, p. 700.
  R28 Review of D. W. Davies and Elizabeth S. Wrigley (eds.), A Concordance to the Essays of Francis Bacon, Modern Language Review, 70: 601–2.
  R29 Review of Laurence Stapleton, The Elected Circle. Studies in the Art of Prose, Review of English Studies, 26: 363–5.
  R30 “Monumentales Nachschlagewerk mit Schönheitsfehlern”. Review of The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 6/7 Sept., p. 58.
  R31 Review of R. L. Colie, Shakespeare’s Living Art, Review of English Studies, 26: 470–2.
1977 R32 Review of Wilbur Samuel Howell, Eighteenth-Century British Logic and Rhetoric, TLS, 5 Aug., p. 965.
  R33 “Englische Rhetorik und Poetik”, Wolfenbütteler Renaissance Mitteilungen, 1: 21–4.
  R34 Review of John Monfasani, George of Trebizond. A Biography and a Study of his Rhetoric and Logic, The Quarterly Journal of Speech, 63: 443–8.
1978 R35 Review of Arthur Heiserman, The Novel before the Novel. Essays and Discussions about the Beginnings of Prose Fiction in the West, TLS, 3 Feb., p. 118.
  R36 Review of Rüdiger Ahrens, Die Essays von Francis Bacon. Literarische Form und moralistische Aussage; Arthur Johnston (ed.), Francis Bacon. The Advancement of Learning and New Atlantis; William A. Armstrong (ed.), Francis Bacon. The Advancement of Learning: Book I, Modern Language Review, 73: 377–80.
  R37 Review of Richard Helgerson, The Elizabethan Prodigals; A. C. Hamilton, Sir Philip Sidney. A Study of his Life and Works, Queen’s Quarterly, 85: 308–14.
  R38 “Italian Influences on English Renaissance Poetry”. Review of Michael Smith, English Translations and Imitations of Italian Madrigal Verse; Anthony Mortimer, Petrarch’s Canzoniere in the English Renaissance, Wolfenbütteler Renaissance Mitteilungen, 2: 69–70.
1979 R39 Review of Cecil H. Clough (ed.), Cultural Aspects of the Italian Renaissance. Essays in Honour of Paul Oskar Kristeller, Modern Language Review, 74: 134–8.
  R40 Review of Chaïm Perelman, L’Empire rhétorique. Rhétorique et argumentation, Quarterly Journal of Speech, 65: 334–5.
1980 R41 Review of David Sapir and J. Christopher Crocker (eds.), The Social Use of Metaphor: Essays on the Anthropology of Rhetoric, Modern Language Review, 75: 830–2.
  R42 Review of Robert Weimann, Shakespeare and the Popular Tradition in the Theatre: Studies  in the Social Dimension of Dramatic Form and Function, Shakespeare Quarterly, 32: 107–18.
  R43 Review of F. L. Huntley, Bishop Hall, 1574–1656; Leonard D. Tourney, Joseph Hall, Renaissance Quarterly, 32: 285–90.
  R44 Review of David Bevington and Jay L.Halio (eds.), Shakespeare, Pattern of Excelling Nature, Shakespeare Quarterly, 32: 402–7.
1982 R45 “Rhetoric and Renaissance Literature”. Review of W. J. Kennedy, Rhetorical Norms in Renaissance Literature; J. B. Altman, The Tudor Play of Mind. Rhetorical Inquiry and the Development of Elizabethan Drama; J. S. Chamberlin, Increase and Multiply. Arts-of-Discourse Procedure in the Preaching of Donne; A. D. Weiner, Sir Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Protestantism; T. H. Cain, Praise in ‘The Fairie Queene’, etc., Rhetorik, 2: 106–30.
  R46 Review of Howard C. Cole, The ‘All’s Well’ Story from Boccaccio to Shakespeare, TLS, 18 June, p. 678.
  R47 Review of Lawrence Danson (ed.), On King Lear, TLS, 10 Aug., p. 911.
  R48 Review of Marion Trousdale, Shakespeare and the Rhetoricians, TLS, 8 Oct., p. 1110.
  R49 Review of Robert W. Uphaus, Beyond Tragedy: Structure and Experience in Shakespeare’s Romances, TLS, 22 Oct., p. 1158.
1983 R50 Review of J. M. Kuist (ed.), The Nichols File of the Gentleman’s Magazine, TLS, 7 Jan., p. 5.
  R51 Review of Zahava K. McKeon, Novels and Arguments:  Inventing Rhetorical Criticism, TLS, 5 Aug., p. 841.
  R52 Review of Adam Smith, Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, TLS, 23 Sept., p. 1024.
  R53 Review of Michael Murrin, The Allegorical Epic, Modern Language Quarterly, 43: 291–3.
  R54 Review of James J. Murphy, A Short Title Catalogue of Works on Rhetorical Theory from the Beginning of Printing to A.D. 1700, Quarterly Journal of Speech, 69: 441–4.
1984 R55 Review of Scienze Credenze Occulte Livelli di Cultura, English Historical Review, 390: 114–18.
  R56 Review of Lessico Intelletuale Europeo (Gen. Editor Tullio Gregory), Wolfenbütteler Renaissance Mitteilungen, 8: 44–9.
  R57 Review of Thomas Hägg, The Novel in Antiquity; R. L. Hunter, A Study of ‘Daphnis & Chloe’, TLS, 20 April, p. 427.
  R58 Review of Alistair Fox, Thomas More. History and Providence, Journal of Modern History, 56: 311–16.
  R59 Review of Keir Elam, Shakespeare’s Universe of Discourse: Language-games in the comedies, TLS, 21 Sept., p. 1045.
  R60 Review of Peter Malekin, Liberty and Love. English Literature and Society 1640–88, Review of English Studies, n. s. 35: 232–4.
  R61 “Errata in J. J. Murphy, Renaissance Rhetoric”, Quarterly Journal of Speech, 70: 335–8.
  R61a Review of M. Fumaroli, L’Age de l’Éloquence. Rhétorique et res literaria de la Renaissance au Seuil de l’Époque Classique, History of European Ideas, 5: 427–37.
1985 R62 Review of Mordechai Feingold, The Mathematician’s Apprenticeship: Science, Universities and Society in England 1560–1640, Journal for the History of Astronomy, 16: 56–9.
  R63 Review of Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, ed. H. J. Oliver; Henry V, ed. G. Taylor; Troilus and Cressida, ed. K. Muir; Troilus and Cressida, ed. K. Palmer; Review of English Studies, n. s. 36: 415–24.
1986 R64 Review of Michael Mooney, Vico in the Tradition of Rhetoric, TLS, 4 April, p. 365.
1987 R65 Review of William Webster Newbold (ed.), Thomas Wright, ‘The Passions of the Mind in General’, TLS, 24 July, p. 788.
  R66 Review of Jacques Queron, Pic de la Mirandole, Isis, 78: 301–2.
1988 R67 Review of H. Hawkins, The Devil’s Party: Critical Counter-interpretations of Shakespearian Drama, Notes & Queries, 35: 226–7.
  R68 Review of Michael Kiernan (ed.), Sir Francis Bacon: The Essayes or Counsels, Civill and Morall, Modern Language Review, 83: 403–5.
  R69 Review of Thomas N. Corns, The Development of Milton’s Prose Style, Modern Language Review, 83: 673–7.
  R70 Review of E. A. Reitan, ed., The Best of the ‘Gentleman’s Magazine’ 1731–1754, TLS, 8–14 July, p. 761.
  R71 “Bard-watching”. Essay review of recent Shakespeare criticism, TLS, 26 Aug.–1 Sept., pp. 933–5.
  R72 Review of Thomas O. Sloane, Donne, Milton, and the End of Humanist Rhetoric, Renaissance Quarterly, 41: 525–8.
  R73 Review of Sir Philip Sidney, The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia (The New Arcadia), ed. Victor Skretkowicz, TLS, 18–24 Nov., p. 1285.
  R74 Review of Graham Rees assisted by Christopher Upton, Francis Bacon’s Natural Philosophy: A New Source, British Journal for the History of Science, 21: 256–7.
1989 R75 Review of W. B. Horner (ed.), The Present State of Scholarship in Historical and Contemporary Rhetoric, Modern Language Review, 84: 455–7.
  R76 “Words to things”, Review of Antonio Pérez-Ramos, Francis Bacon’s Idea of Science and the Maker’s Knowledge Tradition, Times Higher Education Supplement, 5 May, p. 28.
  R77 Review of Heinrich F. Plett, Englische Rhetorik und Poetik 1479–1660. Eine systematische Bibliographie, Wolfenbütteler Renaissance Mitteilungen, 13: 75–80.
  R78 Review of Stanley Wells and Gary Taylor (eds.), William Shakespeare, The Complete Works (Oxford, 1986), and id., William Shakespeare, The Textual Companion (Oxford, 1987), Review of English Studies, 40: 402–11.
1990 R79 Review of William Kerrigan and Gordon Braden, The Idea of the Renaissance, TLS, 30 March–5 April, p. 350.
  R80 Review of David Pingree (ed.) Picatrix. The Latin Version of the Ghayat-Al-Hakim, Isis, 81: 103–4.
  R81 Review of David B. Ruderman, Kabbalah, Magic, and Science: the cultural universe of a sixteenth-century Jewish physician, Times Higher Education Supplement, 8 June, p. 23.
  R82 Review of Richard Marienstras, New Perspectives on the Shakespearean World, tr.Janet Lloyd, Renaissance Quarterly, 43: 438–41.
  R83 Review of Richard Kieckhefer, Magic in the Middle Ages, Times Higher Education Supplement, 12 Oct., p. 20.
  R84 Review of Debora K. Shuger, Sacred Rhetoric: The Christian Grand Style in the English Renaissance, and Sarah Spence, Rhetorics of Reason and Desire: Vergil, Augustine, and the Troubadours, Arion, n.s.1: 225–8.
1991 R85 Review of Craig Kallendorf, In Praise of Aeneas. Virgil and Epideictic Rhetoric in the Early Renaissance, Bibliothèque d’Humanisme et de Renaissance, 53: 215–17.
  R86 Review of Arthur Sherbo, The Birth of Shakespeare Studies: Commentaries from Rowe (1700) to Boswell-Malone (1821), Modern Language Review, 86: 398–9.
  R87 “Casts of Mind”. Review of G. E. R. Lloyd, Demystifying Mentalities, Times Higher Education Supplement, 26 July, p. 21.
  R88 Review of John S. Mebane, Renaissance Magic and the Return of the Golden Age: The Occult Tradition and Marlowe, Jonson, and Shakespeare, Renaissance Quarterly, 44: 365–9.
  R89 “Something rocking in Denmark”. Review of Bryan N. S. Gooch and David Thatcher, eds. A Shakespeare Music Catalogue, 5 vols., TLS, 30 Aug., pp. 14–15.
  R90 Review of E. A. J. Honigmann, Myriad-minded Shakespeare: Essays, Chiefly on the Tragedies and Problem Comedies, Modern Philology, 89: 106–9.
  R91 “Humanistic revival”. Review of Anthony Grafton, Defenders of the Text: The Traditions of Scholarship in an Age of Science, 1450–1800, Times Higher Education Supplement, 20 Sept., p. 26.
  R92 Review of William H. Huffman, Robert Fludd and the end of the Renaissance, Wolfenbütteler Renaissance Mitteilungen, 15: 133–5.
  R93 Review of R. Kieckhefer, Magic in the Middle Ages; W. Shumaker, Natural Magic and Modern Science: Four Treatises 1590–1657; S. J. Tambiah, Magic, Science, Religion and the Scope of Rationality, Isis, 82: 728–31.
  R94 Review of William McCuaig, Carlo Sigonio: The Changing World of the Late Renaissance, History, 76: 304–5.
1992 R95 “Retrospective revenge”. Review of S. Pumfrey, P. Rossi and M. Slawinski (eds.), Science, Culture and Popular Belief in Renaissance Europe, Times Higher Education Supplement, 29 May, p. 27.
  R96 “Legal theory and court practice”. Review of Ian Maclean, Interpretation and Meaning in the Renaissance. The case of law, TLS, 20 Nov., p. 28.
  R97 Review of Timothy Hampton, Writing from History: The Rhetoric of Exemplarity in Renaissance Literature, History, 77: 494–5.
1993 R98 Review of Stanley Wells (ed.), Shakespeare. A Bibliographical Guide, Review of English Studies, n. s. 44: 250–5.
  R99 Review of J. W. Binns, Intellectual Culture in Elizabethan and Jacobean England: The Latin Writings of the Age, Library, 15: 151–5.
  R100 Review of M. R. McVaugh and N. G. Siraisi (eds.), Renaissance medical learning: evolution and tradition, Gesnerus, 50: 148–55.
  R101 Review of Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost, ed.George Hibbard; Macbeth, ed. Nicholas Brooke, Renaissance Studies, 7: 229–41.
  R102 Review of Werner Hüllen, ‘Their Manner of Discourse’: Nachdenken über Sprache im Umkreis der Royal Society, Isis, 84: 579–80.
  R103 Hamlet by Dogberry”. Review of Shakespearean Originals: First Editions. The Tragicall Historie of Hamlet Prince of Denmark, ed. Graham Holderness and Bryan Loughrey, TLS, 24 Dec., pp. 5–6.
1994 R104 Review of Donna B. Hamilton, Shakespeare and the Politics of Protestant England; Leeds Barroll, Politics, Plague, and Shakespeare’s Theater. The Stuart Years, TLS, 22 April, pp. 3–4.
  R105 Review of Paola Zambelli, L’ambigua natura della magia, Isis, 85: 318–20.
  R106 Review of Valerie I. J. Flint, The Rise of Magic in Early Medieval Europe, History of European Ideas, 18: 275–87.
  R107 “Who’s in, who’s out”. Review of Irena R. Makaryk (ed.) Encyclopedia of Contemporary Literary Theory, TLS, 15 July, pp. 8–9.
  R109 Review of Julian Martin, Francis Bacon, the State, and the Reform of Natural Philosophy, Renaissance Quarterly, 47: 704–7.
  R110 Review of Brian P. Copenhaver (ed.), Hermetica. The Greek Corpus Hermeticum and the Latin Asclepius in a new English translation, with notes and introduction, Ambix, 41: 45–8.
  R111 Review of J. N. Cox and L. J. Reynolds (eds.), New Historical Literary Study. Essays on Reproducing Texts Representing History, Analytical & Enumerative Bibliography, 8: 122–9.
1995 R112 Review of A. Buck (ed.), Die okkulten Wissenschaften in der Renaissance, Annals of Science, 55: 77–84.
  R113 Review of George Barth, The Pianist as Orator. Beethoven and the Transformation of Keyboard Style, Rhetorica, 13: 98–101.
  R114 Review of Ruth Padel, Whom Gods Destroy. Elements of Greek and Tragic Madness, TLS, 9 June, p. 32.
  R115 Review of Neil Rhodes, The Power of Eloquence and English Renaissance Literature, Modern Philology, 92: 508–13.
  R116 Review of Robert K. Faulkner, Francis Bacon and the Project of Progress; B. H. G. Wormald, Francis Bacon: History, Politics, and Science, 1561–1626, Isis, 86: 324–5.
  R117 Review of Iulius Caesar Scaliger, Poetices libri septem; Sieben Bücher über die Dichtkunst, ed. Luc Deitz, Vols. I–III, Bulletin of the Society for Renaissance Studies, 13: 23–9.
  R118 Review of Gert Ueding et al. (eds.), Historisches Wörterbuch der Rhetorik. Vol. 1 (A-Bib), Rhetorica, 13: 345–58.
  R119 Review of: G. H. R.Parkinson (ed.), The Renaissance and Seventeenth-century Rationalism (Routledge History of Philosophy, Vol IV), History and Philosophy of Logic, 16: 269–70.
  R120 Review of Jonathan Hope, The Authorship of Shakespeare’s Plays. A socio-linguistic study, TLS, 22 Dec., pp. 4–5.
1996 R121 Review of Heinrich F. Plett (ed.), Renaissance-Rhetorik. Renaissance Rhetoric; Peter E. Medine (ed.), Thomas Wilson, The Art of Rhetoric (1560), Renaissance Quarterly, 49: 438–40.
  R122 Review of Doreen Innes, Harry Hine and Christopher Pelling (eds.), Ethics and Rhetoric. Classical essays for Donald Russell on his seventy-fifth birthday; Malcolm Heath (tr. and ed.), Hermogenes ‘On Issues’, TLS, 2 Aug., p. 27.
  R123 Review of Quentin Skinner, Reason and Rhetoric in the Philosophy of Hobbes, TLS, 26 Aug., pp. 27–8.
  R124 Review of George Molland, Mathematics and the Medieval Ancestry of Physics, Annals of Science, 53: 640–2.
  R125 Review of Robert S. Miola, Shakespeare and Classical Comedy: The Influence of Plautus and Terence, Modern Language Review, 91: 964–6.
1997 R126 Review of Jerry Weinberger (ed.), Francis Bacon: The History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh, TLS, 29 Aug., p. 27.
  R127 Review of Larry S. Champion, The Essential Shakespeare: An Annotated Bibliography of Major Modern Studies, Shakespeare Quarterly, 48: 484–7.
1998 R128 Review of Adam Potkay, The Fate of Eloquence in the Age of Hume, Rhetorik, 16: 98–9.
  R129 Review of Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune. The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon; Perez Zagorin, Francis Bacon, TLS, 19 June, pp. 12, 14.
  R130 Review of Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, ed. R. Warren and S. Wells; A Midsummer Night’s Dream, ed. P. Holland, Review of English Studies, 49: 215–21.
  R131 Review of Peter Auksi, Christian Plain Style: The Evolution of a Spiritual Ideal, Renaissance Quarterly, 51: 260–3.
  R132 Review of M. L. McLaughlin, Literary Imitation in the Italian Renaissance, Modern Language Review, 93: 850–2.
  R133 Review of Dolora A. Wojciehowski, Old Masters, New Subjects: Early Modern and Poststructuralist Theories of Will, Modern Language Review, 93: 776–8.
  R134 Review of Aristoteles latine interpretibus variis edidit Academia Regia Borussica Berlin, ed. E. Kessler, Gesnerus, 55: 124–5.
1999 R135 Review of Heinrich F. Plett, English Rhetoric and Poetics, A Systematic Bibliography, International Journal of the Classical Tradition, 5: 260–6.
  R136 Review of Edward Grant, The Foundations of Modern Science in the Middle Ages, Annals of Science, 56: 101–2.
  R137 “Derrida and the TLS”. Review of John D. Caputo (editor), Deconstruction in a Nutshell. A Conversation with Jacques Derrida; Seán Burke, The Death and Return of the Author. Criticism and Subjectivity in Barthes, Foucault and Derrida, TLS, 12 February 1999, p. 12.
  R138 Review of Gary A. Stringer (ed.), The Variorum Edition of the Poetry of John Donne, Volume 6, The Anniversaries and the Epicedes and Obsequies, Analytical and Enumerative Bibliography, 10: 32–7.
  R139 Review of Gary A. Stringer et al., The Variorum Edition of the Poetry of John Donne, Volume 8, The Epigrams, Epithalamions, Inscriptions, and Miscellaneous Poems, Analytical and Enumerative Bibliography, 10: 105–8.
  R140 Review of Shakespeare, Othello, ed. E. A. J. Honigmann; The Two Noble Kinsmen, ed. L. Potter, Review of English Studies, 50: 79–84.
  R141 Review of Franciscus Iunius, De Pictura Veterum Libri Tres, vol. 1, ed. Colette Nativel, Rhetorica, 17: 220–1.
  R142 Review of Graham Rees (ed.), The Oxford Francis Bacon, Vol VI: Philosophical Studies c. 1611–1619, Isis, 90: 117–9.
  R143 Review of Shakespeare, Henry IV Part 2, ed. R. Weis, Review of English Studies, n. s. 50: 530–1.
  R144 Review of Shakespeare, King Edward III, ed. Giorgio Melchiori; The First Quarto of ‘Hamlet’, ed. Kathleen O. Irace; Pericles, Prince of Tyre, ed. Doreen DelVecchio and Antony Hammond, Yearbook of English Studies, 30: 300–3.
  R145 Review of Julie Robin Solomon, Objectivity in the making. Francis Bacon and the Politics of Inquiry, Isis, 90: 594–5.
2000 R146 Review of Yun Lee Too, The Idea of Ancient Literary Criticism, and Stephen Usher, Greek Oratory, TLS, 11 Feb.: 10.
  R147 Review of Julius Caesar Scaliger, Poetices Libri Septem; Sieben Bücher über die Dichtkunst, Vol. IV: Book 5, ed. L. Deitz and G. Vogt-Spira, Bulletin of the Society for Renaissance Studies, 17: 27–8.
2001 R148 Review of H. J. Jackson and George Whalley (eds.), The Collected Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Vol. 12. Marginalia, IV. Pamphlets to Shakespeare, Yearbook of English Studies, 31: 267–8.
  R149 Review of David Scott Kastan (ed.), A Companion to Shakespeare. Review of English Studies, n. s. 52: 566–70.
  R150 Review of Peter Beal, In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England. Analytical and Enumerative Bibliography, 12: 112–16.
  R151 Review of Daniel Garber and Michael Ayers (eds.), with the assistance of Roger Ariew and Allan Gabbey, The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy, Renaissance Quarterly, 54: 618–24.
  R152 Review of Jay L. Halio (ed.), Shakespeare and Fletcher, King Henry VIII, or All is True; Gordon McMullan (ed.), King Henry VIII, Review of English Studies, n. s. 52: 122–7.
  R153 Review of Don Foster, Author Unknown. On the trail of Anonymous, TLS, 6 July, p. 27.
  R154 Review of Rose-Mary Sargent (ed.), Francis Bacon, Selected Philosophical Works, Isis, 92: 783–4.
  R155 Review of James L. Harner (ed.), The World Shakespeare Bibliography 1980–1996 on CD-Rom, Analytical and Enumerative Bibliography, 12: 305–7.
2002 R156 Review of Lorna Flint, Shakespeare’s Third Keyboard. The Significance of Rime in Shakespeare’s Plays; Charles H. Frey, Making Sense of Shakespeare, Modern Language Review, 97: 170–2.
  R157 Review of Review of Richard Rex (ed.), A Reformation Rhetoric. Thomas Swynnerton’s The Tropes and Figures of Scripture, Rhetorica, 20: 98–100
2003 R158 Review of John Jowett (ed.), Shakespeare, Richard III, Review of English Studies,  n. s. 54: 242–6.
  R159 Review of Stephen Gaukroger, Francis Bacon and the Transformation of Early-Modern Philosophy, Renaissance Quarterly, 56: 856–9.
  R160 Review of Brendan Dooley, Morandi’s Last Prophecy and the End of Renaissance Politics, English Historical Review, 118: 1387–8.
2004 R161 Review of Peter Mack, Elizabethan Rhetoric, Review of English Studies, n. s. 55: 122–4.
2005 R162 Review of N. F. Blake, A Grammar of Shakespeare’s Language, Review of English Studies, n.s. 56: 145–7.
  R163 Review of J.C. Scaliger, Poetices libri septem. Sieben Bücher über die Dichtkunst, vol. V, ed. and trans. Gregor Vogt-Spira and Luc Deitz, Bulletin of Renaissance Studies, 22: 32–6.
  R164 “Idle Worship”. Review of Peter Dawkins, The Shakespeare Enigma; Richards Malim (ed.), Great Oxford. Essays on the life and works of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, 1550–1604; Alex Jack (ed.), Hamlet By Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare; Scott McCrea, The Case for Shakespeare. The end of the authorship question, TLS, 19 August, pp. 6–8.
2006 R165 Review of Lukas Erne, Shakespeare as Literary Dramatist, Modern Language Review101: 225–6.
  R166 “By other hands”. Review of The Oxford Complete Works of Shakespeare, Second Edition, TLS, 11 August, pp. 10–12.
  R167 “ ‘The Face of the Bard?’ New Light on the Stratford Shakespeare Monuments”, TLS, 18–25 August, pp. 16–17.
  R168 “Corses and cares”. Review of Steven W. May and William Ringler, Jr., Elizabethan Poetry. A Bibliography and first-line index of English verse, 1559–1603, TLS, 10 February, p. 7.
  R169 Review of Stephen A. McKnight, The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon’s Thought, Renaissance Quarterly 60: 320–1.
  R170 “Experts and Middle-Men”. Review of Eric Ash, Power, Knowledge, and Expertise in Elizabethan England, Metascience 15: 503–6.
  R171 “A rage for order”. Review of Robert Applebaum, Literature and Utopian politics in Seventeenth-Century England; Paul A. Olson, The Kingdom of Science. Literary Utopianism and British Education, 1612–1870; Toby Green, Thomas More’s Magician. A Novel Account of Utopia in Mexico, TLS, 10 June, pp. 13–15.
2007 R172 “A living art”, Review of Andrew Laird (ed.), Ancient Literary Criticism and Gert Ueding (ed.), Historisches Wörterbuch der Rhetorik, Band 7, TLS, 5 October, p. 10.
  R173 Review of Heinrich F. Plett, Rhetoric and Renaissance Culture, Rhetorica, 25: 435–9.
2008 R174 Review of Gary A. Stringer et el. (eds.), The Variorum Edition of the Poetry of John Donne, vol. 7, part 1: The Holy Sonnets, TLS….
2009 R175 “Heavenly Eloquence”, review of Carla Mazzio, The Inarticulate Renaissance. Language Trouble in an Age of Eloquence, and Sylvia Adamson, Gavin Alexander and Katrin Ettenhuber (eds.), Renaissance Figures of Speech, Times Literary Supplement, 29 May 2009, pp. 10-11.
2012 R176 “The Library of a Polymath”. Essay review of Urs B. Leu, Raffael Keller and Sandra Weimann, Conrad Gessner’s Private Library (Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2008), Annals of Science, 69: 571-4.
R177 Review of A. S. G. Edwards (ed.), ‘W. W. Greg Fifty Years On’ (Textual Cultures, 2009), Publications of the Bibliographical Society of America, 106: 131-3.
2014 R178 Review of Standish Henning and John Hazel Smith (eds), The Comedy of Errors. A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare, Review of English Studies, 75: 733-7.
R179 Review of Iulius Caesar Scaliger, Poetices libri septem. Sieben Bücher über die Dichtkunst Band VI, Renaissance Studies, 28: 799-800.
2015 R180 Review of A. S. McGrade (ed.), Richard Hooker, Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity. A critical Edition with modern spelling, Review of English Studies, 66 (2015): 575-7.
2016 R181 Review of Lawrence Manley and Sally-Beth MacLean, Lord Strange’s Men and Their Plays, in Modern Philology 113 (2015): E81–E86.
R182 “Shakespeare’s kind of play?”, review of Peter Kirwan, Shakespeare and the Idea of Apocrypha, Times Literary Supplement, 22 April 2016, pp. 8-9.
  • Featured Publications

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    For more details, please click on the book cover above.

Brian Vickers (ed.), The Complete Works of John Ford, Volume II and III. Oxford University Press, 29 September 2016. Hardcover £180.00. 992 pages. 234x156mm. ISBN 9780198748878

Volumes II and III of the Complete Works of John Ford contain the six plays that Ford wrote at the beginning of his theatrical career in collaboration with other dramatists: The Laws of Candy (1619-20) with Massinger, The Witch of Edmonton (1621) with Dekker and Rowley, The Welsh Ambassador (1623) with Dekker, The Spanish Gypsy (1623) with Dekker, Rowley, and Middleton, The Sun’s Darling (1624) with Dekker, and The Fair Maid of the Inn (1626) with Massinger and Webster. This is the first time that Ford’s co-authored works have been collected. In Volume II the General Editor, Sir Brian Vickers, contributes two Introductions, ‘Co-authorship in Jacobean and Caroline Drama’, and ‘Identifying Co-Authors’. In the first he reviews collaborative authorship (practiced by every dramatist of this period), in terms of theatrical conditions, the competing companies, the need for new repertoire, the process of assigning individual contributions and assembling the whole play. In the second he discusses the methods that have been applied over the last two centuries to identify co-authors. He then provides separate discussions of the authorship problem in each play, evaluating previous attributions and bringing new evidence to bear. A special feature of this volume is the introduction of a new methodology, based on computer software programs that identify student plagiarism. Used in combination with high-speed search engines and a large electronic database of contemporary plays, this method permits for the first time accurate identification of each co-author’s contribution.

Volume III contains the text of the plays, edited by a team composed of established and younger scholars. Five of the plays — The Laws of Candy, The Witch of Edmonton, The Spanish Gypsy, The Sun’s Darling and The Fair Maid of the Inn — have been freshly edited from the original editions, surviving copies of which have been collated to identify press corrections. The sixth, The Welsh Ambassador, has been edited from the sole extant manuscript. For each work the editors provide an introduction that discusses the play’s date and theatrical genesis, its sources, dramaturgy and other features. A full commentary is provided for all texts, giving historical explanations of the vocabulary, parallel passages in other works by Ford, and theatrical annotation, where relevant. This volume provides a unique opportunity for everyone interested in the career of a major playwright to appreciate how he learned his trade by collaborating with more experienced dramatists, a process in which his own distinctive voice was formed.

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Brian Vickers, The One King LearHarvard University Press, 21 April  2016. Hardcover $45.00 • £30.00 • €35.00. 410 pages. 6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches, 7 halftones, 1 line illustration, 2 tables. ISBN 9780674504844

King Lear exists in two different texts: the Quarto (1608) and the Folio (1623). Because each supplies passages missing in the other, for over 200 years editors combined the two to form a single text, the basis for all modern productions. Then in the 1980s a group of influential scholars argued that the two texts represent different versions of King Lear, that Shakespeare revised his play in light of theatrical performance. The two-text theory has since hardened into orthodoxy. Now for the first time in a book-length argument, one of the world’s most eminent Shakespeare scholars challenges the two-text theory. At stake is the way Shakespeare’s greatest play is read and performed.

Sir Brian Vickers demonstrates that the cuts in the Quarto were in fact carried out by the printer because he had underestimated the amount of paper he would need. Paper was an expensive commodity in the early modern period, and printers counted the number of lines or words in a manuscript before ordering their supply. As for the Folio, whereas the revisionists claim that Shakespeare cut the text in order to alter the balance between characters, Vickers sees no evidence of his agency. These cuts were likely made by the theater company to speed up the action. Vickers includes responses to the revisionist theory made by leading literary scholars, who show that the Folio cuts damage the play’s moral and emotional structure and are impracticable on the stage.

Praise for The One King Lear:

“This is a big, bold book, a major piece of scholarship for everyone to engage with. No one interested in the texts of Shakespeare’s work (and not only in the texts of King Lear) will be able to ignore it.”

– Peter Holland, University of Notre Dame

The One ‘King Lear’ is concerned with one of the most interesting and controversial issues relating not just to the two texts of what some see as Shakespeare’s greatest play, but to the dramatist and his art. There is much to enjoy in this book, and much to learn from it.”

– H.R. Woudhuysen, University of Oxford

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B41-2008(Co-author) Mächtige Worte. Antike Rhetorik und europäische Literatur, by Brian Vickers and Sabine Köllmann (Berlin: LIT-Verlag, 2008), partial translation of  B23, with new material.

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B40-2007Shakespeare, ‘A Lover’s Complaint’, and John Davies of Hereford (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007), pp. xii, 329.

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B39-2005(Co-Editor) Shakespeare. The Critical Tradition. The Merchant of Venice, ed. by William Baker and Brian Vickers (London and New York; Continuum, 2004), pp. xli, 437. General Editor’s Preface, pp. ix–xli.

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B38-2004(General Editor) Shakespeare. The Critical Tradition. Coriolanus, 1687–1940, ed. by David George (London and New York; Continuum, 2004), pp. xxvi, 448. General Editor’s Preface, pp. viii–xxiii.

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B37-2002Shakespeare, Co-author. A Historical Study of Five Collaborative Plays (Oxford University Press, 2002), pp. xxix, 561. ISBN: 978-0-19-925653-2

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B36-2002‘Counterfeiting’ Shakespeare. Evidence, Authorship, and John Ford’s Funerall Elegye (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), pp. xxvii, 568.

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B35-2001(General editor) Shakespeare. The Critical Tradition. Measure for Measure, 1783–1920 ed. by George Geckle (London and NJ: Athlone Press, 2001), pp. xxxvi, 382. General Editor’s Preface, pp. x–xxxiv.

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B34-2000(Editor) English Renaissance Literary Criticism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000), Pp. xv, 675. ISBN: 978-0-19-818679-3

‘Vickers’s splendid, fifty-five-page introduction puts his selection in context, tracing its application of the dazzling variety of classical rhetoric. This must be one of the most pithily compressed accounts ever attempted of criticism as applied rhetoric. It treats two related features most fully: imitatio, and the conception of literature as recommending virtue.
…Vickers rightly rebuts Foucault’s ill-informed notion of originality as an eighteenth-century discovery. In the Renaissance, a route to originality lay through assimilating a model’s qualities by imitatio, as Shakespeare did.…

The introduction treats the criterion of decorum as a relatively minor topic, equivalent to “correctness”. Fuller treatment might have brought out better its ramifying, ubiquitous presence in English criticism … But most of the emphases and judgments of the introduction could hardly have been bettered…..

Since English Renaissance Literary Criticism may well become the standard reference collection, its canon assumes some importance. Certain of the inclusions are inevitable.…

Vickers’s Notes are a model of pertinence and economy. They not only adduce a wide variety of ancient source, but ascribe these discriminatingly, in accordance with modern scholarship. And they implicitly confirm the coherence of English Renaissance criticism, by pointing to the same rhetorical authorities and showing the routes by which ancient criticism and rhetoric came to be absorbed.…

However, this excellent anthology can be recommended with very few reservations.’

– Alastair Fowler, Times Literary Supplement, 9 June 2000

‘Vickers’s introduction is lucid, wide-ranging and masterly. His notes are superb and properly acknowledge the contributions of earlier scholars. His selection of texts is enterprising, including much that is new, as well as a judicious choice of the best that is well-known. He provides a helpful glossary and user-friendly indexes to the material. This book is as useful as Russell and Winterbottom’s famous selection of Ancient Literary Criticism and when it appears in paperback teachers and students of renaissance literature will find it indispensable.’

– Peter Mack, Rhetorica (Winter 2002)

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B33-1999(General editor) Shakespeare. The Critical Tradition. A Midsummer Night’s Dream, 1775–1920, ed. by Judith M. Kennedy and Richard F. Kennedy (London and NJ: Athlone Press, 1999), pp. xxi, 461. General Editor’s Preface, pp. x–xix.

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B32a-2002(Editor) Francis Bacon, The Essays and Counsels, Civil and Moral (The Folio Society, 2002).

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B32-1999(Editor) Francis Bacon, The Essays and Counsels, Civil and Moral (Oxford World’s Classics, 1999): pp. xliii, 216.

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B31-1998(General editor) Shakespeare. The Critical Tradition. Richard II, 1780–1920 ed. by Charles Forker (London and NJ: Athlone Press, 1998), pp. xviii, 593. General Editor’s Preface, pp. x–xv.

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B30-1998(Editor) Francis Bacon, History of the Reign of King Henry VII (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. x, 281. (“Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought”)

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B29-1996(General editor) Shakespeare. The Critical Tradition. King John ed. by Joseph Candido (London and NJ: Athlone Press, 1996), pp. xvi, 415. General Editor’s Preface, pp. vi–ix.

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B28c-2008(Editor) Francis Bacon (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), pp. li, 813. (“ Oxford World’s Classics”)

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B28b-2002(Editor) Francis Bacon (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), pp. li, 813. (“The Oxford Authors”)

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B28a-1996(Editor) Francis Bacon (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996), pp. li, 813. (“The Oxford Authors”).

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B28-1996(Editor) Francis Bacon (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996), pp. li, 813. (“The Oxford Authors”)

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B27a-2001Ripensare Shakespeare. Questioni di critica contemporanea (Milan, 2001). Italian translation of B27 by Mario Baccianini, Marina Merella, and Alessandra Di Luzio.

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B27-1994Appropriating Shakespeare: Contemporary Critical Quarrels (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1993), pp. xvi, 501. Paperback ed. 1994; repr. 1996.

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B26-1989Returning to Shakespeare (London: Routledge, 1989), pp. viii, 257.

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B25a-1989Classical Rhetoric in English Poetry; second ed., with new Preface and additional bibliography (Carbondale, Ill.: Southern Illinois University Press, 1989), pp. vii, 186.

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B25-1989Classical Rhetoric in English Poetry; second ed., with new Preface and additional bibliography (Carbondale, Ill.: Southern Illinois University Press, 1989), pp. vii, 186.

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B24-1988Francis Bacon, German translation of  B15 and A30 by Reinhard Kaiser (Berlin: Wagenbach, 1988), pp. 78.

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B23a-1994Storia della retorica (Bologna: il Mulino, 1994), pp. 649. Italian translation of B23 by Rocco Coronato; introduction by Andrea Battistini.

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B23-1988In Defence of Rhetoric (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988), pp. xi, 508.

‘Brian Vickers has written an invaluable book for anyone concerned with the arts of language, and his title is exact. In Defence of Rhetoric is just that, but it is also more than the word ‘defence’ might ordinarily suggest. A skilled orator well versed in the art he espouses, Professor Vickers examines his subject in all its various parts. The result is a comprehensive survey of the subject that both instructs and defends.…

The third part of his defence lies in an examination of the art itself. This begins in the book’s opening chapter, where he presents an eighty-two part summary of classical rhetoric. It is one of the most useful summaries I have read.’

– Marion Trousdale, Modern Language Review 85, 1990

‘“It is better to will the good than to know the truth”, Petrarch famously declared. Brian Vickers agrees and, heir to an anti-Platonist tradition that goes back at least to Isocrates in the fourth century BC, he argues that the will is best directed to the good by means of rhetoric, the art of persuasive communication and the systematization of natural eloquence. In his admirably learned, wide-ranging and thoroughly polemical history of that art, Professor Vickers also accepts the Renaissance view (which derives from Cicero and, ultimately, from Aristotle’s Rhetoric) that “the way to the will … [lies] partly through the reason”…

One of Vickers’s great accomplishments is that, with an erudition as deep as his touch is light, he shows the central role rhetoric has actually played in Western culture. He documents in painstaking detail the immense efforts devoted to the teaching and learning of rhetoric, in Rome as well as in the Renaissance….…

Vickers’s avowed goal is to restore rhetoric to the central position within culture which, he argues, it often enjoyed in the past and which he passionately, and not always unreasonably, believes it still deserves….…

Vickers’s book is also a triumph of formal exposition. It contains a remarkably lucid account of the three genres of oratory (judicial, deliberative and epideictic), of the five stages of rhetorical composition, of the six parts of the oration, and of the orator’s three duties (to instruct, to move and to delight). It also includes the best and clearest discussion of the rhetorical tropes and figures of which I am aware….…

It would be inappropriate to end this discussion on anything other than a note of gratitude for the inventio, dispositio and elocutio displayed in this remarkable history.’

– Alexander Nehamas, Times Literary Supplement, 15–21 July 1988

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B22a-1987(Editor) English Science, Bacon to Newton (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. xi, 244.

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B22-1987(Editor) English Science, Bacon to Newton (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. xi, 244.

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B21-1986(Editor) Public and Private Life in the Seventeenth Century: The Mackenzie-Evelyn Debate (Delmar, NY: Scholars’ Facsimiles and Reprints, 1986), pp. xlii, 277. – Introduction, pp. ix–xlii.

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B20-1985(Editor) Arbeit, Musse, Meditation. Betrachtungen zur Vita activa und Vita contemplativa (Zurich: Verlag der Fachvereine, 1985), pp. 307. (Proceedings of an international symposium held at the Centre for Renaissance Studies in 1981). – Introduction, pp. 1–19.

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B19a-1990Mentalidades ocultas y científicas en el Renacimento (Madrid: Alianza Editorial, 1990), pp. 318. Abridged Spanish translation of B19 by Jorge Vigil Rubio.

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B19-1984(Editor) Occult and Scientific Mentalities in the Renaissance(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984), pp. xiv., 408. – Introduction, pp. 1–55.

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B18-1982(Editor) Rhetoric Revalued. Papers from the International Society for the History of Rhetoric (Binghamton, NY: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 1982), pp. 281. – Introduction, pp. 13–39.

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B17-1979(Editor) Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage. Volume 6. 1774–1801 (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1981), pp. 650.

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B16-1979(Editor) Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage. Volume 5. 1765–1774 (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1979), pp. xvi, 569.

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B15-1978Francis Bacon (London: Longman, 1978), pp. 46; repr. in British Writers ed. I. Scott-Kilvert, Vol. 1 (New York: Scribner’s, 1979), pp. 257–74.

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B14-1976Shakespeare’s Coriolanus (London: Edward Arnold, 1976), pp. 68. (“Studies in English Literature” series).

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B13-1976(Editor) Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage. Volume 4. 1753–1765 (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1976), pp. xiv, 583.

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B12-1976(Editor) Hooker: The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity. An Abridged Edition. Co-editor: A.S. McGrade (London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1976), pp. 413. Introduction 2: “Hooker’s Prose Style”, pp. 41–59.

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B11-1975(Editor) Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage. Volume 3. 1733–1752 (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1975), pp. xii, 487.

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B10-1974(Editor) Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage. Volume 2. 1693–1733 (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1974), pp. xi, 549.

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B9-1974(Editor) Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage. Volume 1. 1623–1692 (London and Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1974), pp. xi, 448.

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B8-1973Towards Greek Tragedy (London: Longman, 1973), pp. xvi, 658; repr. 1979.

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B7-1970Classical Rhetoric in English Poetry (London: Macmillan, 1970), pp. 180.

‘Brian Vickers has an enviable trick of making his subject fascinating and readable. The eagerness and conviction of his style has been a feature of all his books so far, and this one does not fall short in this respect. Like The Artistry of Shakespeare’s Prose and Francis Bacon and Renaissance Prose, it opens side-questions, hints at the writer’s inadequacy to deal with certain matters and invites the reader to fill the gaps, and promises more goods to come. The reader’s expectations are thus constantly alerted, and if some remain unfulfilled by the present book, the recompense of others which are, is great. …
The first chapter, “A concise history of rhetoric”, manages, in short space, to do well something which no writer has hitherto attempted: to give a broad and informed view of the whole development of rhetoric as a literary discipline, from ancient Greece to the nineteenth century. Nowhere does his account falter or flag. …

The kernel of the book, however, is chapter 3, “The function of rhetorical figures”. Here, Dr. Vickers comes to the point of his argument, which is that “the figures contain within themselves a whole series of emotional and psychological effects” (p. 79). The thesis, that the tropes and figures of rhetoric are not at all “a nuisance, a quite sterile appendage to rhetoric” (p. 12) is persuasively argued.’

– Kirsty Cochrane, Review of English Studies, 1971

‘Brian Vickers has provided what has been missing all along, a just, even handed, and comprehensive treatment of this subject. …

Vickers manages neither to despise rhetoric nor to claim too much for it as an aid to our understanding. He is admirable aware of the twofold dangers in a mechanistic, too-technical approach to the interrelationship of rhetoric and poetry: that of losing sight of the poem and that of losing the interest of a large proportion of his readers. When he does bring his book to its natural climax in the final chapter, with rhetorical analyses of poetry by Sidney, Spenser, and Herbert, he is gentle to both poem and reader, even to the point of warning us that these “are samples and demonstrations, and suffer from the usual fault of demonstration pieces, that the points have probably been too myopically and laboriously spelled out.” …

If there is one central idea, and one fresh perspective which Vickers wishes to offer his reader, it is this “… that rhetorical figures are the conventional representation of verbal patterns expressed in states of extreme emotion” (p. 94). His argument in support of this contention is both persuasive and attractive. …

The scholar already familiar with current studies of rhetoric will still find the book a convenient addition to his library; the student looking for easy access to the field will find it a valuable tool indeed.’

– Russell M. Brown, Renaissance and Reformation 9, 1972

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B6-1969(Editor) Seventeenth Century Prose: An Anthology (London: Longman, 1969), pp. 2

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B5-1968(Editor) The World of Jonathan Swift (Oxford: Blackwell; Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press), pp. ix, 273. – Introduction, pp. 1–24.

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B4a-1972(Editor) Essential Articles for the Study of Francis Bacon (London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1972), pp. xxiii, 323. – Introduction, pp. xi–xxiii.

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B4-1968(Editor) Essential Articles for the Study of Francis Bacon (Hamden, CT: Archon Press, 1968), pp. xxiii, 323. English publication by Sidgwick & Jackson (London, 1972). – Introduction, pp. xi–xxiii.

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B3b-2005The Artistry of Shakespeare’s Prose, Third Edition (London: Routledge, 2005), pp.vii, 452.

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B3a-1979The Artistry of Shakespeare’s Prose. Revised Edition (London: Methuen, 1979), pp. x, 452.

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B3-1968The Artistry of Shakespeare’s Prose (London: Methuen, 1968), pp. ix, 452.

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B42-2012(Co-editor) The Collected Works of John Ford, Volume I, edited by Gilles Monsarrat, Brian Vickers, and R. J. C. Watt (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012), pp. xiv, 720. ISBN: 978-0-19-959290-6

‘The pieces collected in this volume, including the Elegy on John Fletcher and various commendatory poems edited by Vickers, were all circumstantial writings, whose specific occasions are convincingly clarified; at the same time, the editors have taken care to outline the deep coherence of Ford’s ideas, together with their progressive elaboration and the unevenness of their expression, sometimes firm and felicitous, sometimes lacking conceptual clarity and rigour. In that respect, this first volume of Ford’s Collected Works does not consist of independent editions bound together; it reads as the result of efficient teamwork, presenting the reader with the exciting reconstruction of a young writer’s formative years. …

The volume does not only provide accurate, careful, old-spelling editions based on fresh collation of existing manuscripts, known copies of early editions and previous modern editions; its substantial introductions are usefully complemented with clear commentaries elucidating archaic vocabulary as well as sources, analogues, and Ford’s unacknowledged translations and borrowings from classical authors. …

Two forthcoming volumes are announced. One will gather plays Ford wrote in collaboration with fellow dramatists, the other will collect Ford’s either sole-authored plays. When the whole set is completed, it will prove an invaluable reference work likely to give Fordian studies a fresh impetus and to provide scholars with a precious tool for a better understanding of the English literary scene between 1606 and 1638.’

– Yves Peyré, Cahiers Élisabéthains 81, 2012

‘Brian Vickers’s “Preface” to this, the first of three volumes that together will make up The Collected Works of John Ford, introduces the larger project with an overview of the editorial tradition, beginning with the single surviving copy of a volume from 1652, Comedies, Tragi-Comedies: & Tragœdies: written By John Ford, and following on the discontinuous history of fallings out and failings through Henry Weber’s edition of 1811, William Gifford’s of 1827, Dyce’s revision of Gifford in 1869, and into the twentieth century. Editor-in-chief of the new edition, and part also of its team of twelve collaborating co-editors, Vickers is well placed to survey, in sorrow if not in anger, what has been well or ill done by his predecessors …

In its making this edition prompts confidence from its users. Those sections of the text I have checked are accurate; the bibliographical descriptions in the “Introductions” are careful and full of detail …

Monsarrat, Vickers, and Watt’s undertaking demonstrates … that the first volume of Ford delivers a great deal, and, with the plays still to come in this new Collected Works, promises even more.’

– Tom Lockwood, The Library 7.14.3, 2013

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B2-1968Francis Bacon and Renaissance Prose (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1968), pp. xi, 316.

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B1a-1987

(Editor) Henry Mackenzie, The Man of Feeling (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987); reprint with corrections and bibliographical additions, pp. xxx, 137.

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B1-1967(Editor) Henry Mackenzie, The Man of Feeling (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1967), pp. xxx, 137 (“Oxford English Novels” series).

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